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Quick Hits: Legends, Lebdas, and Arenas

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Sorry for the lack of Quick Hits yesterday, there was simply no news to report.

  • The Ducks have extended head coach Randy Carlyle.  Despite many Ducks fans being upset over this, I feel it is the right call by the front office and their issues lay more with the defense and depth than with the coaching staff. [Anaheim Calling]
  • Alex Kovalev is not leaving the NHL quietly.  He is now ridiculing former coaches and blasting media members.  Not really the way I expected the great Kovalev to leave the league. [Puck Daddy]
  • EA has announced legends will be in NHL 12.  Gretzky and Lemieux for sure and it looks like Chelios, Yzerman, Howe, Borque, and Bure will as well.  Prime Sergei Fedorov, please? [Puck Daddy]
  • The BFF relationship between the Sharks and Wild continued this weekend as the Wild acquired James Sheppard for a third round pick.  Hardly a blockbuster, but it is still interesting given the previous trades that included names like Brent Burns, Devin Setoguchi, Dany Heatley, and Martin Havlat. [Fear the Fin]
  • Helene St. James has a player preview up for Jonathan Ericsson.  Same ol', same ol': use your damn body, Ericsson. [Detroit Free Press]
  • The Predators waived former Red Wings defenseman Brett Lebda this past weekend and he cleared waivers yesterday.  Not even Detroit would pick him up.  [Aol Sporting News]
  • Bill Shea of Crain's Detroit Business speculates that a new Wings arena will likely be built near I-75 and Woodward.  He has come to this conclusion due to a proposed railway, partially funded by the Ilitch family, which would go right near this location. [Crain's Detroit Business (subscription required) via Malik]

Discussion for the day: which legends do you want to see in NHL 12 and how would you like them to be involved?

Update: As was pointed out on Twitter, Wayne Gretzky was traded on this day 23 years ago to the Los Angeles Kings. It was a trade that shocked the entire sporting world because it showed that no one was immune to the business of sports, and set the precedent that even a sport's greatest superstars could be moved. What are your memories of that trade?