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Nicklas Lidstrom, Sergei Fedorov named 2015 Hockey Hall of Fame Inductees

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The 1989 Detroit draft class set the franchise up for its 24 consecutive playoff appearances.

Dave Sandford/Getty Images

The Hockey Hall of Fame just got a little more perfect. "The Perfect Human" himself, Nicklas Lidstrom and Sergei Fedorov will join hockey's immortals in the Toronto-based shrine.

Their NHL lives started pretty much at the same time, with Lidstrom being picked in the third round of the 1989 NHL Entry Draft and Fedorov being the fourth-round selection.

Both will be getting in on their first ballot, and deservedly so. Lidstrom played 20 seasons in the NHL, all with the Detroit Red Wings and all with a trip to the postseason. He finished his rookie year with an absurd 60 points, but he lost out on the Calder Trophy to soon-to-be fellow Hall-of-Famer Pavel Bure.

Lidstrom did everything so well in both ends of the ice: He led the charge and controlled the play, shutting down opportunities in the Red Wings' zone and creating scoring chances seemingly at will in the offensive zone. Part of his impact can be seen in the scrambling that the Red Wings have been doing on the blue line in the years since he retired. On top of the on-ice accomplishments, he carried himself with the utmost integrity off the ice, especially in the six seasons he donned the "C" as Red Wings captain.

Fedorov played 18 seasons in the NHL, 13 with the Red Wings. His 13 seasons with Detroit were the best of his career. Fedorov in his prime was the most dazzling display of pure talent the hockey world had ever seen. He had a career year in 1993-94, where his 120 points was second-most in the NHL that season. Despite losing out on the Art Ross, he still won the Hart Trophy, Selke, and the Lester B. Pearson (now known as the Ted Lindsay).

Fedorov's 120 points are the most a Red Wing has ever had in a single season since, and he led the team in scoring three times in his 13 seasons in Detroit. He also was one of the three forwards that comprised the famous Russian Five that formed a dominant five-man unit in the NHL. Despite the less than ideal circumstances surrounding his departure from Detroit, he still managed to remain a productive player well into his 30s.

Fedorov retires with his name on the Stanley Cup three times, Lidstrom four, all with Detroit.

Nicklas Lidstrom Highlights

Watch Lidstrom save a goal, stop a 2-on-1, and even stop a 3-on-1!

Lidstrom plays God for 13 seconds during the 2002 Stanley Cup Final.

A more recent memory for the youngin's out there.

Hat trick!

Someone dared to ask the question if Lidstrom really was the perfect human.

Sergei Fedorov Highlights

Fedorov's skating was artistry.

Putting up points when it counted.

Five goals in a single game.

So much for "The Great One."

Fedorov had a lot of fun showing off.